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at the university of colorado law school. she talked about gender discrimination cases and her own experiences as a woman law school graduate in the early 1960s. this conversation is about an hour, 15 minutes. .. >> we are so grateful to have you here, phil, for all your work. [applause] >> we have several regions here, two of whom are grads of our fine law school, michael and jodi your and irene is here also i believe. and any other regions are here, we thank you for all your support and your spirit. we do very much believe in engaging with the community come and we want to continue to do so in so many ways. i would echo what melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase award given from the president's office given to melissa hard for her work in community service. so i want to acknowledge mullah so hard. [applause] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you make such a dif
started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little bit slow. we had this conversation 10 years ago. now, i will stick my neck out and say for a variety of reasons, some of which are circumstantial, some of which have to do with the leadership in the standing committee come i believe that this topic will have to become an a more important topic. and that wi
of russia's retaliation against an american law that puts sanctions on officials suspected of human rights violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said he'd do it, he's done it. >> that's right, david. there's been one question that has dominated political life in moscow the last few days and that is will he or won't he? will president putin sign what is one of the most controversial laws he's been face with. yesterday he indicated he probably would and today he signed it. as you mentioned it has been very controversial because a number of ministers in his own government, including the russian foreign minister have publicly criticized the law and president putin's critics have accused him of playing politics with russian children. >> criticized it on humanitarian grounds. >> yes, absolutely. it's interesting to note that the bill we're talking about, the law we're talking abo
protestant churches. this reinforced a second exceptional pillar, common law, which posits that god-given, or the laws given from god to the people and it bubbles up word to the rumors. it gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common-law stand in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that has developed some form of civil law come in which law trickles down from the top. both germany and england had common-law for a while, but by the 20th century both have more or less abandoned it. germany more so than england. therefore, by the end of world war ii, when you have unloaded however unwillingly its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. us, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant religion influenced and shaped everything about american foundation of laws and defined its system of personnel rights. it wasn't just that the united states was a democratic republic, but that the very premises of what a democratic republic meant were likely to be
of a new law in russia that bars american citizens from adopting russian children. president vladimir putin has signed the law, which places new strains on bilateral relations. >> the new law comes in response to american legislation that withholds visas to russians accused of human rights violations and freezes their u.s. assets. >> most bills signed by president putin have not been subjected to so much public scrutiny, but the ban on americans adopting russian children is controversial, so putin's strategy is to appeal to russian patriotism. >> as far as i know from opinion polls, the vast majority of russian citizens have a negative opinion of foreigners adopting our children. russia can and must look after its own children. >> at the same time, a russian judge acquitted a former prison doctor. human rights activists say he is responsible for the death of a russian lawyer in 2009. the lawyer was imprisoned after accusing russian officials of the $230 million tax fraud. since his death, relations beween the u.s. and russia have increasingly soured, culminating in the adoption van --over 7
hospitalized in november for treatment of bronchitis-related cough. and in our nation's capital, law i can makers meeting outside of cameras and microphones, so we don't know whatey they are saying, but we know they arote negotiating. coming up with ways to prevent tax hikes and spending cuts if no deal is reached before then. mitch mcconnell telling us they have been going back and forth all day and talks are continuing into the evening. no major progress though yet to report. and that is how fox reports on this saturday, december 29th. i'mm harris falkner. tomorrow, tune in for a specialal two-hour fox report as the fiscal cliff deadline nears on the eve of the last stock market day of theae year. we will be all over it with deadlines and they are trying to get a vote, something together. "huckabee" starts now. >> this week on the journal editorial report. a look back at the year that was and what is ahead for 2013. 2012 was a tough year for conservatives on the national level, but in the states, some hopeful signs of reform, and looking forward, is the economy headed for rebound orie se
the lawful property of southern families, namely their slaves. and there was no compromise that could erase those tensions. they had been trying to compromise the issue of slavery for three generations. they compromised over slavery when they wrote the constitution. they compromised over slavery when they passed the northwest -- opening the upper midwest. they compromised over slavery in 1820 with the famous missouri compromise. they compromised over slavery in 1850 with the fugitive slave act and in 1854 with the kansas/nebraska act. the dred scott opinion of the supreme court was supposed to be compromised, resolving the issue of slavery. they had tried and tried and tried to compromise. it had not worked and that is why the crisis came. if one nation sharing the same congress, operating under the same laws, could not compromise the issue, how could two nations side-by-side, sharing these vital arteries of commerce and communication, how could they hope to resolve the issue? and what's more, lincoln understood that if secession managed one success there would not be illogical into it. we
a shooting inside police headquarters. the egyptian president has signed into law a controversial new constitution after official confirmation should a clear majority for the document in a referendum. >> morsi is due to address parliament on saturday after appointing 90 members to the senate. >> critics say the new basic law is islamist and undemocratic. >> the opposition kept up its protest for weeks, but it was not enough. anchor fled on the streets of cairo after official results were announced. critics say the referendum was marred by fraud. am i in my opinion, the revolution continues, and the constitution does not exist. a constitution has to be for everyone, not split the people of egypt. >> everybody knows the results are wrong. i will continue protesting peacefully until our demands are met. >> egypt's election commission says nearly 64% of voters approved the constitution in tibia will rounds of balloting, a clear majority, but the overall turnout was only about 33%. with the official results in, the constitution's islamists supporters are looking ahead. the muslim -- the mu
before the health care law kicks in. so, we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> aen what happened this year was the supreme court helping this along, you have the justices essentially rewrite legislation changing the plain text that congress passed in order to declare obamacare constitutional, which is a little scary, that that highest justices in the land would take that sort of activist role and you mentioned france, dan, that's scary. the back drop of this whole presidential year is europe. we know where the path leads. and the turmoil and welfare states and how unsustainability and the high unemployment that comes with them and that was the back drop of our presidential campaign. >> paul: okay, the voters said, yeah, we're going to keep moving in that direction, kim. i mean, how, what do you think the electorate is here, behind the choices that jason just suggested they might be? >> barack obama won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. so if you went
, bring your own bag or pay 10 cents for each recyclable paper bag. similar laws are in affect in san jose, san francisco and dozens of other california cities and counties. san jose said since the ban took affect, the number of plastic bags littering city streets has gone down 59%. >>> around here, we're seeing the sun shining finally. and -- . >> i am sure that is listed on paper. i am sure when they wrote that, it looked like a good idea. >> i butchered it twice now. >> plastic bag ban bandwagon. >> you got it. took a lot of practice. >> and took careful thought, too, let me actual. a chilly start today, don't you think in. >> yeah, yeah freezeing. >> temperatures were literally freezing and in santa rosa last night and chilly with the numbers this morning, 30s and 40s, 45 degrees at concord; oakland, 40 degrees. sfo at 43 and san jose, 48 and below freezeing in santa rosa and a few high clouds as we gaze toward the bay bridge and out of the door this morning, still going to be cold as you head out an hour from now. the number yes are in the 40s for much of the bay area and chillier inl
's by law or by culture. and i think most everybody would have understood early on that by law, the nation was secular, but by choice, the nation was -- in otr words, its people were christians and there's always been that dynamic, people have always understood there's a tension there between a population that's largely christian but uses its freedom to choose christiity and the laws that say go ahead and be whatever religion you want to be. >> this is what i understand from your text. one of five of the founding fathers had any religious stressed denomination or affiliation and that was when it existed calvinist and that was prett9 much of a god almost independent of jesus, correct, a watch maker god who starts the earth and tn he leaves it on its own, a deistic god? >> well, no, in terms of the population there's the calvinists and the deists. >> way back then? >> right. the calvinists totally predominated among the population. the founding fathers were much more elites and yes, many of them were deists but in terms of the vast majority of deistshey they thought about it in terms of calv
. but how do you define and that codify that into law? that's a much trickier issue. david: that was scott rasmussen with the latest poll on gun control and don't forget to tune into varney 9:20 sharp. and nicole-- okay, we'll go back to nicole, as soon as we find her, she's wandering the floor of the nyse. and stuart may be out this christmas eve, that doesn't mean he isn't spreading holiday cheer. liston what he has to say at 10:45, a christmas message from stuart. meanwhile, we are headed towards the fiscal cliff and if congress doesn't act soon the the u.s. economy could take a nosedive right off it. all this have comes as capitol hill, could a value-added tax be in the pipeline? are we slowly turning to europe. david, good to see you. and we already see us moving in terms of spending to the european model. will we move in terms of tax policy to the european model, specifically to a value-added tax like they have in most of europe? >> personally i think we should. >> on top of what we have, on top of an income tax. >> we need to cut back and what i would cut back is replacement for the
, marchand has no guilt about taking so much time off. in fact, it's the law. full-time workers in france are guaranteed at least five weeks vacation and a maximum 35-hour work week, with no paid overtime allowed. and not everyone is thrilled about working even 35 hours. >> the aim is to keep your job without working. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm leslie stahl. in this episode, we'll examine our relationship with work. how much is too much, too little, and who should decide? but before we look at the hours we spend on the job, we'll look at how employers tried to influence the way their workers act off the job. as morley safer reported in 2005, that cigarette or drink at home, that political candidate you supported, even your eating habits are coming under the scrutiny of your employer. if your boss doesn't approve, it might even cost you your job. >> anita epolito and cara stiffler were considered model employees at weyco, an insurance consulting firm outside of lansing, michigan. anita, 14 years on the job, cara, five. they sat side by side, sharing workloads and after work the
it constitutional under the taxing power even though the plain language of the law it wasn't a tax. justice roberts was clearly looking for any rationale to uphold the law. >> i think because he was looking not to get criticized, have the court criticized for being too political. he probably believes he was protecting the reputation of court but he made the court look more political and hurt his reputation and ultimately the court, too. if you have your own hit or miss please send it to us and sure to follow us on twitter. thanks to my panel and to all of you watching. i'm paul gigot. happy new year and hope to see you right here next week. >> gregg: a fox news alert. we are getting word from the nation's capital that harry reid will soon be coming out and address the fiscal cliff at the microphones any moment now. congressional leaders are holding marathon negotiations behind closed doors. we're only getting drips of what is going on racing against the clock as the final countdown to the fiscal cliff deadline begins. unless a deal is reached by january 1st, more than $500 billion in tax increases
people come out and huff and puff in public and then behind closed doors they're accepting the law of the land. lan but also begs the question of, do you want to spend your time trying to do the things it did not release him to pay off much in the last election? >> jason dick, emily goodin, thank you for being on "newsmakers." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> we will show our conversation with luke messer today again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. coast chambers of congress are in -- both chambers of congress are in. the senate is in at 1:00 eastern time. votes are scheduled at 2:00 p.m. eastern. majority leader harry reid and minority leader mcconnell had set a deadline of 3:00 p.m. when they're planning to convene a caucus meetings and update members of the parties on a possible plan for taxes and spending on the new year. will bring you live coverage of the senate on c-span2 started at 1:00 eastern. in the house, the return of 2:00 p.m. you'll be considering a number of pieces of legislation. what the live
. >> nancy, you went to harvard law school. you went to oxford. you could have done so many things. how did you end up at the white house? >> i could have done many things and i have done many things. i started off as a lawyer. i am from a small town. my mom raised three kids on her own. she did not have a college education, but she is viewed in me that i could have one. >> how did she do that? >> she had very high expectations and let me know that she wanted me to do very well in school. when i would talk to her about one in to work in the white house sunday or being interested in politics, she would say you have to study hard and get good grades because you will need a scholarship. i cannot afford it, but she never said i could not do it. that was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i went to law school. in the early 1980's, when i got out of law school and was going around to law firms, even at that point, there were not many women in law firms. people would sit me down and say, do you understand that if we take you into this law firm, you will have to try cases? [laughter] t
is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed two weeks ago. that law puts financial restrictions on russians accused of human rights violations, bans them from also traveling to the united states. i want to bring in our matthew chance from london. and matthew, of course, you were a correspondent in moscow for a very long time here. it seems at least there's a split. you've got russia's foreign minister who actually criticized putin before he signed this ban. so what is going on here? is this a power play? and is this something that is actually going to take effect? >> i mean, you're right. there has been a very rare split in the russian political elite about this issue. there's been some criticism that was leaked to the press in russia about how some officials including the foreign minister concerned about what the impact this may have. also an opposition newspaper in russia has issued a petition, saying the law should not been enacted. that's had more than 100,000 signatures. obviously, it's something that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power
to this crisis. we're talking about the fiscal cliff. >> it hasn't got ensigned into law. there's no success yet there. >> boehner should move it tomorrow. he should just do that. >> jonathan? >> listen, the president campaigned on a three to one spending reduction and we're not see anything spending here. democrats controlled two-thirds of the chips. >> joy ann, why is this all about taxes? >> one reelection and the -- it doesn't do that much spending. >> it's been all about taxes. >> all about raising taxes. >> there's this obsession with raising taxes. >> it was to go after school lunches and elderly care, health care for poor kids and increased spending. >> no, no, no, they want entitlement reform, joy ann. why this obsession with cutting old people's medicare? >> it's not an obsession about cutting benefits to the elderly, joy ann. it's about reforming medicare over time so at some point in the future we don't tell an 80-year-old you know what? you're not going get the medicare cha you thought you would have. this is about not hurting the elderly. >> the republican solution is to hand 80-ye
you in a bad position of the post office. but instead of saying get over it, many state laws about privacy. when supreme court dealt with the case about gps, the supreme court didn't say, hey, we have technology, get over privacy, they said -- and this is a supreme court that doesn't agree on anything, they said privacy is important. something even this minor is where you are to give away information about whether you know it or not abortion clinic, a competitor to your bosses, this information is being tracked on the web through smart phones actually have huge ramifications. it's what we do? in europe, they actually have protective laws. you can find out what data aggregators are talking about you, if you have wrong information, you can correct it. so i might be googling diabetes or a friend or a product, and not for, it doesn't mean that i'm unhealthy, but the federal trade commission is actually considering having a do not track regulation. sort of like the do not call list. i will end up with something that the trade commission that when we were on a panel together. the chairma
no people were injured. gregg: yeah, there you go. heather: with the new year comes more than 200 new laws going on the books and trace will be back with that and a breakdown for us. gregg: just when you thought it was over, new warnings of another little storm heading for the storm-ravaged northeast. we'll get a live report in minutes. heather: and new controversy over a move by russia's president that critics say is playing politics with the lives of orphans. what it could mean for americans who want to adopt overseas. our legal panel debates. i greg: welcome back. jenna: a fox extreme weather alert. this is no system bringing heavy wind and rain and snow to the northeast for dumping as much as 1.5 feet of snow on new york and pennsylvania. after devastating parts of the golf coast with tornadoes speak to the system is moving slowly north. but don't put away the snow shovels yet. there is another storm on the way. jenna: maria molina joins us with the very latest. reporter: you guys are right. we have another snow system that will dump a lot more snow over the northeast, and it actually
with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really t
to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my grandson was a very normal child. when he was 18 months to two years old, he got nine shots in one day. seven of which had thimerosol, mercury. it is a preservative. in 1929 it was tested on the 29 people who had meningitis. they said that the mercury had no impact so they started using solutions.halmologic when children get a few vaccinations, it did not have a huge impact but they started to get as many as 25 or 30 before they get to the first grade. my grandson got nine in one day and he became artistic, banging his head against the wall. then diary and constipation -- diarrhea and constipation. he was doing terrible. i was not aware of autism and all but i was chairman of the committee that did the investigation so i started to looking into with health and human services and the food and drug administration and that is where i had four years of hearings on that and i became convinced that women -- that mercury, women w
, the spanish government has changed laws regarding business hours. it wants visitors to the crisis- ridden country to have more time to spend money -- 90 hours a week instead of 72. >> it should help encourage trade and create more jobs in the sector. >> but the plans are threatening the siesta. the tradition of the lengthy break to unwind and relax is being sacrificed to the demands of the market. the spanish siesta was introduced in response to extreme working conditions. during the post-war period, it was not just the afternoon heat that force people to take a break. >> a lot of people had to take on two jobs at the same time. it was the only way to divide up the day so that you rested not just at night, but also had a break during the day. >> and health-care professionals say it is still a good idea. they recommend a 20-minute midday nap. they say it makes a difference at night. than a 10% of insomnia cases are chronic, and they are usually caused by work. we over lows hour days to the point where we no longer sleep well. we do not give ourselves break, and when we need more time, we t
they didn't commit a federal crime or were sentenced far longer than the law allows. >>> the health care sector is vulnerable to hackers. hospital commutersputers and medical divisions have holes that could cause hackers to get patient's information. >>> obesity may be declining for the first time. the age of obese obese children age 2-4 fell. >>> and netflix is blaming amazon for an outage. netflix says it was traced back to a amazon web services. >> the cloud does not always protect you. >>> storm clouds still over the bay area. the heaviest rain showers have left us but we still have scattered showers and they are going to continue throughout the afternoon. so you're going to need and umbrella. here's a live look at our hi- def doppler. want to zoom in towards the south bay. that's where we're actually seeing a good sized cell now moving over parts of san jose, 880, 101, and 280. here's a look at your forecast over the next several days. we have a dry break by tomorrow and rain returns friday into saturday. >>> this national weather report sponsored by macy'
up holds the president's health care reform law. >> few could have imagined the deciding vote was cast by the chief justice himself. conservatives stunned. liberals perplexed, but thrilled. forging ahead, the roberts court takes on same sex marriage. number nine, yahoo! ceo marissa meyer, at 37, head of a major tech company, a ceo in a male-dominated field, pregnant. it's the baby part that became problematic, shall we say, when meyer decided to take just a couple of weeks for martin leave. the mommy blogosphere went nuts. what message was she sending by not staying home with her baby. >> number eight, south korean rapper, psy. ♪ >> say what you want, his lasso inspired dance style first discovered on youtube, had everyone going gangnam. and we mean everyone. >> the last one and then the -- >> he was riding high in 2012, star performer in the most watched youtube video of all time. ♪ >> number seven, republican presidential candidate mitt romney. >> this election is over, but our principles endure. >> romney ran on his impressive business credentials, but it was his multip
. with regard to legal immigration, think the rule ofn law is remaining the best way oe making sure that people don't come into the country illegally. the risk of an amnesty that is basically all that we are talking about unfortunately is amnesty. every amnesty in the past weather in europe or in then united states has had the effect of attracting more people in the country illegally in the hopes of a future amnesty. lou: years ago i started talking about a rational, humane immigration policy that would take intocy account all of the concerns about displacement of those who were in this country illegally, a due process make a determination of how work permits and legal status occurred. that is not the activist groups in this country t insist upon one thing, it is remarkable demand in my eyes, they insist upon amnesty and this president is insisting upon amnesty. what is your reaction? >> what i worry about most is not amnesty, but incredibly successful campaign toma stigmatize any immigration enforcementti whatsoever.ha when you have opposition across the country to a program called s
. that is the danger of an excess of state. >> [inaudible] how can we get them to take the laws out? [applause] >> we are almost out of time. >> you were raised in a secular household. and how you still classify yourself as not being religious. he still believed to be the correct position. you also mentioned the benefits of religion. this interesting paradox where if everybody held the position you do, we would lose the benefits of religion. how do you reconcile that? >> you are right. it is an empirical question. not a question of logic. it is an empirical question. society can be prosperous and virtuous and freed without religious sustenance. the biggest laboratory for that is post-christian europe. it is not promising. it is a fair question. the logic of my argument is there are a lot more people like me, we would be in big trouble. i think that may be true. >> thank you. >> what are your views on the present state and the future state of the american nuclear family? >> without any doubt, america's biggest problem is not the debt. the fiscal cliff and other metaphorical geology. the biggest proble
because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma attached to this type of issue which in my opinion should be a public health issue. it's a public health issue for a certain segment of the community and should be a public health community issue for everybody
how the two connect. well, this is my mother-in-law, and she was as old as the year, so she was 24 in 1924, when she was married. and i have a feeling that perhaps this was a special wedding present from her husband. i just wonder. it isn't the sort of thing parents would give. oh, no. far too-- far too flippant i would have thought for a parent. but, um, for a husband maybe. it might have been a wedding present. now, let's just have a look here, because i can see on a lot of the pots and the devices and the buffer and so on there's the initial "n." "n." she was nell. wonderful. her name was ellen but she was known as nell. and the hallmarks... well, they're different. i can see their different. they're very tiny. not easy to see. i can see they date from about 1926 through to about 1929. oh, so-- so it couldn't have been a wedding present, so, not a wedding present, but maybe an anniversary present or the birth-of- a-child present. but tell me a little bit about nell. i mean, it's lovely to hear a daughter-in-law saying that she was a lovely mother-in-law.
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
shooting in american history. does the tragedy in connecticut mean the country needs new gun laws? we'll have a fair & balanced look next. so, this board gives me rates for progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. jamie: this just in. the u.s. marine veteran who spent four months behind bars in one of mexico most violent prisons is now home. this is my favorite christmas story because jon hammar was jailed in deplorable conditions on a questionable gun charge in mexico. he was taken to a u.s. hospital with flu-like symptoms. just arriving back at his family's home in florida. that is where steve harrigan is live in palmetto bay, florida. steve, what a christmas gift for this family. >> reporter: jamie, it was rashable to see here, four or five minutes ago
price. >> we have that with current epa. >> with the current epa laws. >> it's a de-facto to us. >> let's say we have that. what does that do to growth? what does that do to -- is that compatible with the continued growth of the american economy because the problem is, with juliet, what you said before, countries take a huge economic nosedive. the problem in selling it is precisely going around and telling people, hey, great news. we're going to tank the economy. >> i am actually a technology ee van gentlem evangelist. i think an economy with bright innovators, which happens to be the case with the united states, i think you can effective do what germany has done and actually having a high tax is not a problem, right? one of the central political problems in the united states is you have to raise tax revenue. why not raise tax revenue from a part of the economy where you want to discourage activity and use that for education. >> the private sector is sitting on more uninvested cash. this is not stock, not money given to owners. >> firms sitting on cash waiting to invest. they are waitin
of law and military justice. we spend millions of dollars to work with the military during a wholesale way on mentor ship and to make sure that human rock -- human rights and the law are instilled drought. -- instill that throughout. >> and where you have seen efforts not working at all, where is it? is it the same? >> again, the challenges are paramount. these are forces that do not howff a great amount of discipline. they do not have great training. enda in many cases, they do not have great education. there is a capacity problem within the drc, and it makes it harder to try to train them up in a way that meets the standards that we would like to see in the military. >> would you like to comment further? gregg's yes, i would. -- >> yes, i would. i would like to say that security sector reform in the army has been a failure, for the most part. it is a failure because of all of things that my colleague has said, but is also a failure because of the elements appear of corruption. soldiers are not paid on a regular basis. they are not sustained and read what in the field -- and reequippe
to new gun laws in the aftermath of the killings in newtown, connecticut. the ceo went on "meet the press" to defend his call for armed guards in every american school, but here's what a couple of front pages said about wane laperriere. one called him a gun nut and another one headlined with the crazy heest man on earth. laperriere he is not backing down. watch. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children, then call me crazy. i'll tell you what the american people -- i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. >> there are several lawmakers who are promising to introduce new gun control legislation, and the president formed a new team to come up with ways to limit assault weapons. >>> an idaho senator is apologizing after he was charged with driving under the investment. they arrested senator michael crapo early yesterday after he ran a red light. he failed several field sobriety tests and his blood alcohol level was .110 well above the legal leg legal limit. he's due in court january 4th. >>> just check out the scene
will create record vak kiss on the laws. >> which stocks specifically are going to suffer in home depot, radio shack, possibly shorts authority, some of the other office supply category killer stores. >> let me go in mr. glass half hull. anybody coming through had. as mentioned referenced so well. you also have you are even outfitters tutting it on ol centr retailers who have not reinvested back in the business are secularly having the shoppers shift away from them. they are going to have a tougher time. >> i think it's too late to save herb greenberg's bet with brian sullivan for this year, but you were on our show just recently, and you've turned positive for j.c. penney. >> i was a lot more positive at 17 than i do 21 and i do think the middle will do better than the upper end or the bottom. the upper end retailers will get hurt because of the tax rates and the lower end hurt because of social security taxes. guys in the middle will do better. the place to be will be the mossle so thenny's will have better numbers in q q4. >> felt like we were talking to stadler on this one. >> does that ma
candlelight vigils, there were more calls for tougher rape laws. . >> we have all decide tad that we will not sell brat new years because this year we have lost a sister from amongst us. and whenever we lose someone of our own, or that person passes away we mourn for them. this time we are spending new year's in mourning >> holman: six men have been arrested and charged with murder in the attack. former president george h-w bush is showing signs of improvement. over the weekend the 88-year-old was moved out of intensive care at a houston hospital, where he'd been fighting off a fever. the 41st president was admitted on november 23 with what began as a bronchitis-related cough. the end of the year brought the end of the line for seven of the 32 head coaches in the national football league. the arizona cardinals, buffalo bills, chicago bears, cleveland browns, kansas city chiefs, philadelphia eagles, and san diego chargers all fired their coaches a day after the regular season ended. five teams also axed their general managers. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ra
will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, y
the nation's commerce. >> reporter: the sticking point in negotiations: a decades old law, called the container royalty fund. it was established in the 1960s to help dockworkers displaced by technology, the port alliance says these days those royalties serve as a bonus to workers, not a safety net. but the union disagrees saying the payments still help compensate workers for lost job opportunities. florida is home to almost a third of the ports that would be affected by the potential strike, governor rick scott says he's still thinks a deal will be reached, but if it doesn't he's counting on washington to step in. allison worrell, "n.b.r.," fort lauderdale, florida. >> susie: volatility was the word of the day here on wall street. investors were fixated on the war of words in washington over the fiscal cliff, and shrugged off some encouraging news today about jobs. fewer americans filed for jobless benefits last week: new claims fell 12,000 to 350,000. but the labor department says the christmas holiday may have distorted the numbers, as some state offices were closed monday and t
% of the boat. the government agrees -- there's a lot, under greek law whatever party comes in first, take a step back, greece has proportional representation that deserves a word of comment. proportional representation is the peculiar idea that if you get a certain percentage of the vote in an election, you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that right the laws. it you didn't do that you exclude the 18% that had a role to play in governing which you think is the idea. in european countries we have proportional representation. if you get more than usually a cut off of 5% to get whatever the percentage of your vote is that is how many seats you get. you all understand i assume we don't do that in united states. if you get 51% of the vote you get it all and 49% wage. we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past. when you read about primary, and they a gets 20 delegates for the convention and candidate b, that is proportional, they get an equal number of delegates, we actually recognized in the united states proportional representation, we jus
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